Monday, June 29, 2020

Professor of the Year Awards 2017 Don Uy-Barreta

Hult faculty are more than professors—they are inspiring and supportive mentors who genuinely care about your Hult journey and beyond.  Every year, our students vote for the professor whos had the greatest impact on them. Join us for a closer look at each of the 2017 award winners and what makes them exceptional in the eyes of Hult students. San Francisco—Bachelor of Business Administration program The 2017 Professor of the Year Award for our  Bachelor of Business Administration  program, San Francisco campus, was awarded to Professor of Economics and Global Discipline Lead  Don Uy-Barreta. As well as postgraduate degrees in both Economics and Finance, Don has over ten years experience in financial services, where he helped  manage nearly $4.5 USD billion in municipal bonds. He was Program Chair at the University of  California at Santa Cruz Extension for their Business Certificate Program, and Assistant  Director for the Business Psychology Hybrid program at Palo Alto University. These days, when not teaching, he is a textbook reviewer and Fellow at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco for their Education Advisory Group. â€Å"I absolutely loved Dons classes. Economic theories and concepts are often confusing, but Don provides great real-world examples that make it easier to understand, as well as actually challenging their validity.† -Alexandra Trzoska, Financial Analyst, Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group, BBA Class of 2016 Hi Don. Many congratulations on the teaching award! How does your business experience inform your teaching style? All of the topics we study are backed up by relevant business or economic examples to enable students to relate to the subject. When I was working in finance it was mandatory for us to be aware of current issues because it could affect our investments. So its critical that students too keep up-to-date with world, economic, and business events, and we often use the Wall Street Journal in class. Students get into the habit of referring to it frequently, which they will then continue to do in the business world. This will help them make better informed decisions—in both their personal and professional lives. Hults immensely diverse student population ensures that we cover topics and perspectives that are globally relevant. -Don Uy-Barreta, Professor of Economics How does student diversity make a difference in your classroom? Hults immensely diverse student population ensures that we dont just study the United States but go all over the world to cover topics and perspectives that are globally relevant. Its a wonderful learning experience for me, too, as my students teach me about their culture, food, and traditions. Don captivates his global economics class in San Francisco Why do you think its important for students to receive a global education? Over the past 25 years, the world in general—and particularly in business—has become so interconnected that its now critical for students to understand how to work with different personalities, cultures, and geographies in order to succeed. The Hult classroom is a great global business world in miniature, where students can test themselves and grow in a safe environment. We couldnt agree more. Thanks Don! More about Don Courses Don teaches at Hult Microeconomics Macroeconomics Business and the World Economy Find Don on LinkedIn Mel Cloney is a staff blogger working in London, and is passionate about the Hult journey. Her writing focuses on faculty, academics, and student and alumni experiences. She’s a food, scuba, and running junkie with a penchant for all things French. Kickstart your career with Hults undergraduate business school. To find out more, take a look at our blog Going beyond business: Introducing our undergraduate curriculum. Download a brochure or get in touch today to find out how Hult can help you to learn about the business world, the future, and yourself. Mel Cloney Mel is a staff blogger working in London, and is passionate about the Hult journey. Her writing focuses on faculty, academics, and student and alumni experiences. She’s a food, scuba, and running junkie with a penchant for all things French. Related posts Academics Beyond (narrow) business concepts: â€Å"Soft† skills turn out to be critical skills News Building success: Dual Degree students win at USASBE Community How going beyond business at Hult helped me launch my company Admissions Accepted Students Weekend: A weekend to remember Careers Career mapping: How to become an executive in the next 5 years 0 Thought leadership How to prepare for an uncertain future in a world of AI Instagram Hult Rotation offers you a chance to study in a truly global way. Our rotation program allows you to study and be immersed in some of the finest cities in the world. 📠¸: @jasminmanzano . Hult Rotation offers you a chance to study in a truly global way. Our rotation program allows you to study and be immersed in some of the finest cities in the world. 📠¸: @jasminmanzano . Each year, Hult seeks to enroll a talented and ambitious incoming class from all over the world. We look for diverse students with a wide range of experiences, perspectives, and interests—students who will thrive in our unique educational atmosphere. Are you ready for a truly global experience? 📠¸: @iambrunadiniz . Each year, Hult seeks to enroll a talented and ambitious incoming class from all over the world. We look for diverse students with a wide range of experiences, perspectives, and interests—students who will thrive in our unique educational atmosphere. Are you ready for a truly global experience? 📠¸: @iambrunadiniz . We’re excited to start 2020 on a ranking high! Hult is proud to have been placed #28 in Poets Quants 2020 rankings for Best Undergraduate Business Schools in the US. Taking a huge leap of 32 places from our 2019 position, we’re also very happy to have secured top positions in key categories like: life-changing experience, practicality of the degree, and global immersion. . With five global campuses, a student body of over 130 nationalities, and a learn-by-doing approach—Hult offers a student experience like no other. . We’re excited to start 2020 on a ranking high! Hult is proud to have been placed #28 in Poets Quants 2020 rankings for Best Undergraduate Business Schools in the US. Taking a huge leap of 32 places from our 2019 position, we’re also very happy to have secured top positions in key categories like: life-changing experience, practicality of the degree, and global immersion. . With five global campuses, a student body of over 130 nationalities, and a learn-by-doing approach—Hult offers a student experience like no other. . â€Å"I’m from an engineering background and needed a whole new skill set for the industry I wanted to switch to. I learned a lot about myself and how I deal with being out of my comfort zone. I learned both soft and hard skills, from how to work in very diverse teams to key accounting metrics and strategy. I was surprised by how weak I was at certain tasks in English or how strong I actually was in other areas. Hult gave me opportunities to try new things and meet people from places I never thought I would have friends. . My internship experiences gave me the chance to broaden my view of different cultures and different companies. I had the opportunity to work and live with people whose values differed from people in my home country. I thought that this would be difficult, but it gave me the chance to reflect on my own values and assess if they were a result of my home country environment or if they were intrinsically mine. . Diederick ter Kulve (@diederick.terkulve) Netherlands Masters in International Business . â€Å"I’m from an engineering background and needed a whole new skill set for the industry I wanted to switch to. I learned a lot about myself and how I deal with being out of my comfort zone. I learned both soft and hard skills, from how to work in very diverse teams to key accounting metrics and strategy. I was surprised by how weak I was at certain tasks in English or how strong I actually was in other areas. Hult gave me opportunities to try new things and meet people from places I never thought I would have friends. . My internship experiences gave me the chance to broaden my view of different cultures and different companies. I had the opportunity to work and live with people whose values differed from people in my home country. I thought that this would be difficult, but it gave me the chance to reflect on my own values and assess if they were a result of my home country environment or if they were intrinsically mine. . Diederick ter Kulve (@diederick.terkulve) Netherlands Masters in International Business . Say a big hello to our Bachelor of Business Administration program cover star, Elisa Orus Plana âÅ" ¨ . â€Å"I’m excited for the future—especially that I cant predict whats going to happen. Maybe Ill end up in Mexico working for a trading company or maybe in Africa, developing my own business. Everything is possible, and the options are constantly changing. I love the idea that Im never going to be stuck doing the same job until the end of my life if I dont want it to be like this. . Hult really supports me and my ambitions and truly believes that we deserve to be considered as professionals as well as students. Here, I get to express not just my opinions but all elements of myself. From my creative side with the Fashion Society to my finance and business sides in Trading Club and the Management Consulting Club. We get a different type of learning here. Not just essential knowledge and theory, but practical skills and mindset. The school is always evolving. We’re encouraged to innovate and to always look for new ways of doing traditional things. We learn how to be more confident and become aware of how we can impact our environment. The school aims to help you become a better version of yourself and to stand out from the crowd.â€Å" . Elisa Orus Plana French Bachelor of Business Administration Class of 2021 Say a big hello to our Bachelor of Business Administration program cover star, Elisa Orus Plana âÅ" ¨ . â€Å"I’m excited for the future—especially that I cant predict whats going to happen. Maybe Ill end up in Mexico working for a trading company or maybe in Africa, developing my own business. Everything is possible, and the options are constantly changing. I love the idea that Im never going to be stuck doing the same job until the end of my life if I dont want it to be like this. . Hult really supports me and my ambitions and truly believes that we deserve to be considered as professionals as well as students. Here, I get to express not just my opinions but all elements of myself. From my creative side with the Fashion Society to my finance and business sides in Trading Club and the Management Consulting Club. We get a different type of learning here. Not just essential knowledge and theory, but practical skills and mindset. The school is always evolving. We’re encouraged to innovate and to always look for new ways of doing traditional things. We learn how to be more confident and become aware of how we can impact our environment. The school aims to help you become a better version of yourself and to stand out from the crowd.â€Å" . Elisa Orus Plana French Bachelor of Business Administration Class of 2021"> During the final days of 2019, you probably reflected on what you’ve accomplished this year—and even this decade—and what you’d like to achieve in 2020. Let us know in the comments below. During the final days of 2019, you probably reflected on what you’ve accomplished this year—and even this decade—and what you’d like to achieve in 2020. Let us know in the comments below. â€Å"The first time we did group work on the program, I went head-to-head with a colleague. It taught me a lot about how I see people, how people see me, and how conflict can be resolved in a kind and productive way. The best feedback you get, when delivered constructively, is the most critical because it really feeds into how you lead. I’ve completely reversed my leadership style—the result is so much richer and more powerful when you lead from behind and lead with strength. . Studying in tandem with working, whilst challenging, gave me the perfect platform to directly apply learning concepts into my business environment, the competitive landscape, and the real-estate industry as a whole. When I started the program, I was very happy in my corporate role. But my courage and aspirations grew to the point that I took on a whole new direction. Having my career coach, Joanna, as a sounding board allowed me to really be strategic and get to know myself. She coached me thro ugh all the interviews, the research, and the questions. It went in parallel with what I was doing academically and after six months everything just clicked. . I went into the EMBA knowing I had nothing to lose and I’ve come out with everything. Great strength, global friends, amazing learning, mentors from professors, a job I love, and the knowledge that I can set my mind to achieve anything and with the right support and resources I’ll get there.† . Kashani Wijetunga British, New Zealand Sri Lankan Associate Director Senior Strategy Consultant CBRE EMBA Class of 2019 . â€Å"The first time we did group work on the program, I went head-to-head with a colleague. It taught me a lot about how I see people, how people see me, and how conflict can be resolved in a kind and productive way. The best feedback you get, when delivered constructively, is the most critical because it really feeds into how you lead. I’ve completely reversed my leadership style—the result is so much richer and more powerful when you lead from behind and lead with strength. . Studying in tandem with working, whilst challenging, gave me the perfect platform to directly apply learning concepts into my business environment, the competitive landscape, and the real-estate industry as a whole. When I started the program, I was very happy in my corporate role. But my courage and aspirations grew to the point that I took on a whole new direction. Having my career coach, Joanna, as a sounding board allowed me to really be strategic and get to know myself. She coached me thro ugh all the interviews, the research, and the questions. It went in parallel with what I was doing academically and after six months everything just clicked. . I went into the EMBA knowing I had nothing to lose and I’ve come out with everything. Great strength, global friends, amazing learning, mentors from professors, a job I love, and the knowledge that I can set my mind to achieve anything and with the right support and resources I’ll get there.† . Kashani Wijetunga British, New Zealand Sri Lankan Associate Director Senior Strategy Consultant CBRE EMBA Class of 2019 . â€Å"It was now or never. I knew that I’d have likely stayed in my neighborhood for years to come if I didn’t take this opportunity. I’d not lived or studied outside of the U.S. before. So I left my job as a global strategist at an advertising agency and moved halfway around the world. I’ve come back a more culturally aware, well-versed person. I’ve realized that everything is a learning experience and an opportunity for growth. Ill definitely carry this mindset with me into the future. Technology and social media allow us to be different people in several places at once. Im excited to see how I can establish myself in whatever city Ill be lucky enough to call home and still maintain deep connections with people all over the world. I’m inspired by my classmates every day. Hearing some of their life stories and how getting this degree fits into their greater mission has been very humbling. My biggest challenge has been finding the ‘right’ path for me. There have been rooms Ive felt like I shouldnt be in, but now Im proud to feel as though I truly belong, wherever I am.† . Dwayne Logan, Jnr. American MBA Class of 2019 . â€Å"It was now or never. I knew that I’d have likely stayed in my neighborhood for years to come if I didn’t take this opportunity. I’d not lived or studied outside of the U.S. before. So I left my job as a global strategist at an advertising agency and moved halfway around the world. I’ve come back a more culturally aware, well-versed person. I’ve realized that everything is a learning experience and an opportunity for growth. Ill definitely carry this mindset with me into the future. Technology and social media allow us to be different people in several places at once. Im excited to see how I can establish myself in whatever city Ill be lucky enough to call home and still maintain deep connections with people all over the world. I’m inspired by my classmates every day. Hearing some of their life stories and how getting this degree fits into their greater mission has been very humbling. My biggest challenge has been finding the ‘right’ path for me. There have been rooms Ive felt like I shouldnt be in, but now Im proud to feel as though I truly belong, wherever I am.† . Dwayne Logan, Jnr. American MBA Class of 2019 . Happy New Year, Hultians! . Happy New Year, Hultians! .

Sunday, May 24, 2020

Euthanasia As A Deliberate Act - 1728 Words

â€Å"Euthanasia is defined as a deliberate act undertaken by one person with the intention of ending life of another person to relieve that person s suffering and where the act is the cause of death.†(Gupta, Bhatnagar and Mishra) Many people believe this as a mercy killing. Euthanasia may be voluntary, non voluntary and involuntary. When a terminally ill patient wants to end his or her life, it is called voluntary euthanasia. Non voluntary euthanasia occurs when the suffering person never wanted nor requested to end their life. Non voluntary euthanasia happens when a patient is in a persistent vegetative state, comatose state, or has mental conditions. Involuntary euthanasia is conducted when treatments of such are against the will of the patient. Euthanasia can be either passive or active. Passive euthanasia means life sustaining treatments are not given and nothing is done to keep the patient alive. â€Å"Active euthanasia occurs when a physician does something by giving d rugs or substances that ends a patient’s life†. (Medical News Today) All humans have different ideas, values, opinions, and beliefs depending on what culture, religion and the society we come from. These differences also change our beliefs whether we allow ourselves to go to the doctor and get a simple influenza shot, and also adults will not let doctors perform unnatural acts or artificial medical injections nor surgeries. People who are against euthanasia view it as murder and that we must respect the value ofShow MoreRelatedTaking a Look at Euthanasia1733 Words   |  7 PagesEuthanasia, also commonly referred to as ‘mercy killing’, and ‘assisted suicide’, has been and continues to be the subject to moral, legal, religious and political debates around the world. At the core of debate lies to competing values between the right for every individual to decide to die with dignity when suffering, and the need to uphold the right to life. (Austra lian Human Rights Commission. 1996) The purpose of this task is to critically analyse the nature and extent of euthanasia and whetherRead MoreI Murdered my Mother685 Words   |  3 Pagesguilty of overdosing my mother but the intention was to save her from dying inch by inch from twinge†. This might be the story of many individuals whose loved ones are suffering from terminal illness. But what brings the person to consider such an act and put their dear ones life to an end? In the game of life and death, life would be the most probable answer one would think. Because life is a precious gift intertwined with emotions and experiences and is substance of ones existence. But when painRead MoreEssay about End of Life Decisions719 Words   |  3 Pages Since we are only on this earth for so long then death becomes one of those issues that we must face. With the new advancements in technology death can become complicated. Also since we have other issues such as euthanasia involved things will only get even more complicated. Euthanasia, definition of death, living will decisions, and ethical issues surrounding these subjects will be discussed. End of Life Decisions No one living on this earth will live forever. It comes a point in time whenRead MoreAnalysis of Philippa Foots Article on Euthanasia Essay1375 Words   |  6 PagesEuthanasia as defined by the Shorter Oxford English Dictionary is a quiet and easy death. One may wonder, is there such a thing as a quiet and easy death? This is one point that I will discuss in my paper, however the question that my paper will answer is; should active euthanasia be legalized? First, I will look at Philippa Foots article on Euthanasia and discuss my opinions on it. Second, I will look at James Rachels article on active and passive euthanasia and discuss why I agree with hisRead MoreThe World Today Is Filled With Pain. Much Of This Pain1271 Words   |  6 Pagesof time of any pain. Then why is euthanasia such a widely debated topic? Euthanasia is a merciful act that can take away pain and give closure to loved ones. The sight of a friend, mentor, family member, or even oneself in a feeble state , nowhere near one’s â€Å"old self†, can be so wretched. Regardless of religion, political views, race, gender, etc, no one wants to experience the pain of this. Voluntary euthanasia and some strictly regulated non-voluntary euthanasia needs to be legalized around theRead MoreThe Legislative Process And Healthcare Lobbying. The Healthcare1019 Words   |  5 Pagesvoting on proposed bills. Separate branches are meant to provide checks and balances to prevent a monopoly of power within the government. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the legislative process and the end-of-life issue of active and passive euthanasia. Part 1 Legislative Process The United States government is made up of three separate branches: the legislative branch, the executive branch and the judicial branch. The legislative branch consists of the Senate and the House of RepresentativesRead MoreEuthanasi The Treatment Of Euthanasia846 Words   |  4 Pagesall forms of Euthanasia, whether passive or active, is a great way to aid and relieve patients with terminal or life threatening illnesses which makes their life unbearable and unliveable. Euthanasia in general is a steady process of ‘assisted suicide’ that aids the patient in ending one’s life with their consent or the consent of their close family member. Active Euthanasia is when death is intentionally accelerated, for example by the injection of a lethal drug; while Passive Euthanasia is the withdrawalRead MoreEuthanasia Is A Medical Act Of A Physician Or Any Other Person?1016 Words   |  5 PagesEuthanasia is defined as the act of a physician or any other person intentional ly killing a person by the administration of drugs, at that person’s voluntary and competent request. It is a ‘mercy killing’ which means to take a deliberate action aimed at ending a life to relieve intractable suffering or persisted pain. (Emanuel et al) Euthanasia could also be interpreted as the practice of ending a life painlessly. Euthanasia is technical description of the act regarding the process that is usuallyRead MoreInvestigating Whether Euthanasia Have a Place in a Civilised Society633 Words   |  3 PagesInvestigating Whether Euthanasia Have a Place in a Civilised Society Euthanasia has been a controversial subject for many years. Since the invention of modern medicine, arguments of moral, ethical and legal issues have been introduced to the topic of euthanasia. The job of the doctors and other professional in medicine is to sustain life for as long as possible, this is their duty. The problem is that the dieing patients want to die happily. Due to euthanasia being illegalRead MoreIs there a morally important difference between killing someone and letting someone die?697 Words   |  3 Pagesactive and passive euthanasia and voluntary and involuntary euthanasia. Active euthanasia, sometimes referred to as ‘positive’ euthanasia, involves a deliberate act, such as lethal injection, that brings about death to a person. On the other hand, passive or ‘negative’ euthanasia is conventionally said to be the omission of an act. For example, when a doctor decides against administering life prolonging drugs or opts to turn off a life support machine, it is considered passive euthanasia. However, these

Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Sir Gawain And The Green Knight - 936 Words

During the fourth chapter of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the journey towards the Green Chapel commences. Sir Gawain is escorted by a member of the Red Manor, who gives the knight a heed of warning. The escort offers advice to not travel to the Green Chapel, and if he chose this path, the escort would not tell of his fleeing. Sir Gawain thanks the escort for his warning but tells him that he has to keep his word, otherwise he would become a coward. The chapel was almost missed, if it not for Sir Gawain noticing â€Å"a rounded hillock on the bank of a stream, near the bed of a torrent that tumbled there† (Sir Gawain 2172-73). Sir Gawain entered the mound, which was the entrance to the chapel. Here, he met up with the Green Knight. This is where he reached the end of his quest and was destined to receive his blow to the neck. Sir Gawain moved away from the first attempt, which caused the Knight to suspect that he was not the true knight of the quest. After a dial ogue was exchanged between the two, the Green Knight struck a blow to Sir Gawain, which only nicked his neck. The Green Knight told him that his wife was Morgan, whom Gawain spent time with in the Manor, and she was sent to test Gawain. The Green Knight called Sir Gawain â€Å"one of the most perfect men who ever walked on the earth† (Sir Gawain 2363). Sir Gawain replied in anger, saying that he was not a virtuous knight, therefore he doesn’t deserve such a remark. Sir Gawain was sent back to Arthur’sShow MoreRelatedSir Gawain And The Green Knight1359 Words   |  6 PagesIn the poem â€Å"Sir Gawain and The Green Knight,† a protagonist emerges depicting an Arthurian knight named Sir Gawain. Sir Gawain, King Arthur’s nephew, takes initiative by accepting the challenge requested by the Green Knight in place of his uncle. He undergoes a perilous adventure, seeking for the Green Knight to receive the final blow. Although Sir Gawain is not viewed as a hero for his military accomplishments, he is, however, viewed as a heroic figure by the Knights at the Round Table for hisRead MoreSir Gawain And The Green Knight862 Words   |  4 PagesIn Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, by an unknown author referred to as the â€Å"Pearl Poet,† we are introduced to Sir Gawain. Gawain is a knight of the Round Table and he is also the nephew of King Arthur. As a knight, Gawain is expected to possess and abide by many chivalrous facets. T hroughout the poem he portrays many of the qualities a knight should possess, such as bravery, courtesy, and honor among others. Because of his ability to possess these virtues even when tempted to stray away from themRead MoreSir Gawain and the Green Knight1100 Words   |  5 PagesThe poem of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight compares a super natural creature to nature. The mystery of the poem is ironic to the anonymous author. The story dates back into the fourteenth century, but no one knows who originally wrote the poem. This unknown author explains in the poem of Sir Gawain not knowing of the location of the Green Chapel and or who the Green Knight really is. This keeps the reader entertained with the suspicion of not knowing. The author then does not give his name orRead MoreSir Gawain And The Green Knight Essay1687 Words   |  7 PagesSir Gawain and the Green Knight contains ambiguity and irony that make it interesting to read and teach. Gawain’s conflict arose whe n he accepted the girdle that could protect him and when he lied to his host, severing fellowship with the lord for courtesy with the lady. By utilizing a social reconstructionist philosophy of teaching that emphasizes personal beliefs and ethics, a teacher will help the students establish their identities and learn to appreciate classic literature. Sir Gawain and theRead MoreSir Gawain And The Green Knight1514 Words   |  7 PagesSir Gawain and the Green Knight is an epic poem written in the mid to late fourteenth century by an unknown author. Throughout the tale, Sir Gawain, a Knight at the Round Table in Camelot, is presented with many hardships, the first being a challenge on Christmas by a man in which, â€Å"Everything about him was an elegant green† (161). This â€Å"Green Knight† challenged someone in Camelot to accept his game which they will chop off his head with his axe and the Green Knight will do the same to the playerRead MoreSir Gawain And The Green K night1335 Words   |  6 PagesSir Gawain: The Ironic Knight Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is a tale of the utmost irony in which Sir Gawain, the most loyal and courteous of all of King Arthur’s knights, fails utterly to be loyal and courteous to his king, his host, his vows, and his God. In each case, Sir Gawain not only fails to perform well, but performs particularly poorly, especially in the case of his relationship with God. Ultimately, Sir Gawain chooses magic over faith, and by doing so, shows his ironic nature as aRead MoreSir Gawain And The Green Knight906 Words   |  4 Pagesusually the latter. In Sir Gawain and the Green Knight we see Sir Bertilak go off to hunt three very specific animals as a game with Sir Gawain. They agree that â€Å"what ever [Bertilak catches] in the wood shall become [Sir Gawain’s], and what ever mishap comes [Sir Gawain’s] way will be given to [Bertilak] in exchange.† (Sir Gawain†¦, ln 1105-1007). In this deal we slowly see Gawain loose his honor as paralleled with Sir B ertilak’s hunt. The first animal that is hunted by the knight is a deer, while thisRead MoreSir Gawain And The Green Knight Essay1521 Words   |  7 PagesFall 16 Donnelly Many years ago, knights were expected to form a certain type of relationship with their king, this relationship was otherwise known as fealty. Fealty is a knight’s sworn loyalty to their king (in other words a loyal relationship should be formed between the two). The use of this relationship is shown in the poem called â€Å"Sir Gawain and the Green Knight† ( the author is unknown). This poem has a classic quest type of formula, with a knight receiving a challenge and then going outRead MoreSir Gawain And The Green Knight1455 Words   |  6 PagesHowever, for Gawain in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight temptation existed around every corner while he was playing the game of the Green Knight. Temptation existed every day and each day it existed in a new way. Gawain never knew what was coming his way throughout the grand scheme of the game, but one thing was for certain he was being tested. Without his reliance religious faith and dedication to his reputation, Gawain wo uld not have been able to make it through the game of the Green Knight alive andRead MoreSir Gawain And The Green Knight Essay1020 Words   |  5 PagesBoth Sir Gawain, from â€Å"Sir Gawain and the Green Knight† translated by Marie Borroff, and Beowulf, from Beowulf translated by Burton Raffel, serve as heroes in different times of Medieval English Literature. Many of the basic principles that describe heroes in Medieval Literature are seen in both of these characters even though they were written in different times. There are distinct similarities, differences, and also a progression of what the hero was in English literature, between Sir Gawain and

Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Margaret Atwood- Feminism - 1227 Words

Jennifer Yeomelakis Major Author Rough Draft 2/13/12 Feminism in the Works of Margaret Atwood Feminism is the belief and advocacy of equal rights for woman. This belief is shown through Margaret Atwood’s works, although she doesn’t believe so â€Å"Every time you write from the point of view of a woman, people say it’s feminist.† Critics all of the world disagree with her and say that Atwood’s novels are blatantly feministic. Margaret Atwood uses time, male chauvinism, and jealousy to display her belief that women aren’t treated fairly, yet they deserve to be. Atwood’s mute female roles create the setting for her In Atwood’s works, time is vital is showing that her feminist beliefs sets the outline in which she displays that belief.†¦show more content†¦They were always destined to be in the situations that they end up in and they spent their whole lives preparing for that situation. Men were meant to become the leaders and women were to be kept in the shadows, but Atwood purposefully changes those destinies for her characters. In the societies built around Atwood’s novels, women are destined from birth to become a certain attribute in the world. Such as in the case of The Handmaid’s Tale, women are destined to become only six things, wives, daughters, handmaids, aunts, marthas, or econowives, they never had the choice of being anything else. In Margaret Atwood’s novels, the characters try to change each other’s destiny, but will find out that no one can change one’s destiny. â€Å"He who could master the hearts of men and their secrets is well on their way to mastering the fates and controlling the thread of his own destiny, not that any man could really do that, not even the Gods† (43) the characters of The Penelopiad believe heavily that the fates control what happens in their life, especially the bad things, and are well aware that they cannot change each other’s destiny. Margaret Atwood’s societies are chauvinistic to show that there was no universal law on how to behave towards other people. Her male dominated, male chauvinistic societies add emphasis to her belief of feminism. Through male chauvinism, the sanctity of marriage or of other relationships is dissolved. Men seem to be allowed to commitShow MoreRelatedFeminism And Gender Roles By Margaret Atwood1518 Words   |  7 PagesIn Surfacing by Margaret Atwood, there are numerous portrayals of feminism and gender roles. There are underlying hints of distaste towards the female sex role and the predatory, aggressive behaviour of men towards women. The suppression of women is portrayed and analyzed, and Surfacing manages to tackle the theme of gender roles by exploring through the perspective of the female narrator how women are marginalized in many aspects of their lives. . Surfacing makes a case for strong women that defyRead MoreEssay on Feminist Ideas in Margaret Atwoods The Handmaids Tale1199 Words   |  5 PagesFeminist Ideas in Margaret Atwoods The Handmaids Tale For this essay, we focused strictly on critics reactions to Margaret Atwoods The Handmaids Tale. For the most part, we found two separate opinions about The Handmaids Tale, concerning feminism. One opinion is that it is a feminist novel, and the opposing opinion that it is not. Feminism: A doctrine advocating social, political, and economic rights for women equal to those of men as recorded in Websters Dictionary. This topic is prevalentRead MoreThe Life and Achievements of Margaret Eleanor Atwood Essay1687 Words   |  7 PagesMargaret Eleanor Atwood, one of the most acclaimed and idolized writers’ to date. Atwood was born in Ottawa, Ontario, on November 18th, 1939 in the Ottawa General Hospital. Two and a half months after the beginning of the Second World War (Atwood). She is a renowned novelist and poet; furthermore writer of short stories, critical studies, screenplays, radio scripts and books for children (Gale). Margaret Atwood is a living inspiration to many writers today. Atwood is a fiction, and non-fiction writerRead MoreShort Story By Margaret Atwood1031 Words   |  5 PagesMargaret Atwood once said, â€Å"I spent much of my childhood in northern Quebec, and often there was no radio, no television - there wasn’t a lot to entertain us. When it rained, I stayed inside reading, writing, drawing.† Born on November 18, 1939, she spent half her childhood moving to different places for her father’s study of entomology (insects). She obtained her love of writing through the different experiences that traveling provided as well as the encouragement of her parents. Though she didRead MoreThe Handmaid s Tale By Margaret Atwood1357 Words   |  6 PagesHow does one define feminism? It means many things to many people. For some it’s more personal, for others it’s the Oxford definition: â€Å"the advocacy of women s rights on the ground of the equality of the sexes† (Oxford dictionary). In the novel The Handma id’s Tale, Margaret Atwood explores feminism through the themes of women’s bodies as political tools, the dynamics of rape culture and the society of complacency. Margaret Atwood was born in 1939, at the beginning of WWII, growing up in a timeRead More Feminist Issues in The Handmaids Tale Essay1316 Words   |  6 Pages  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  The Handmaids Tale, by Margaret Atwood, can be classified as a distopic novel. The Republic of Gilead in The Handmaids Tale is characteristic of a distopia in that it is not intended as a prediction of the future of our society, but rather as a commentary on current social trends. Atwood has created this nation by isolating what she might consider the disturbing aspects of two diametrically opposed factions of our society (namely the religious right and radical feminism) as a theory as to what wouldRead More Feminism In The Handmaids Tale Essay1588 Words   |  7 PagesFeminism In The Handmaids Tale      Ã‚  Ã‚   Feminism as we know it began in the mid 1960s as the Womens Liberation Movement. Among its chief tenants is the idea of womens empowerment, the idea that women are capable of doing and should be allowed to do anything men can do. Feminists believe that neither sex is naturally superior. They stand behind the idea that women are inherently just as strong and intelligent as the so-called stronger sex. Many writers have taken up the cause of feminismRead MoreFeminism Lost in Margaret Atwood’s A Handmaid’s Tale Essay1527 Words   |  7 PagesIn Margaret Atwood’s A Handmaid’s Tale, the human spirit has evolved to such a point that it cannot be subdued by complacency. Atwood shows Gilead as an extremist state with strong religious connotations. We see the outcome of the reversal of women’s rights and a totalitarian government which is based on reproduction. Not only is the government oppressive, but we see the female roles support an d enable the oppression of other female characters. â€Å"This is an open ended text,†¦conscious of the possibilitiesRead MoreThe Handmaid s Tale By Margaret Atwood1249 Words   |  5 PagesDystopian Research Essay: The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood In the words of Erika Gottlieb With control of the past comes domination of the future. A dystopia reflects and discusses major tendencies in contemporary society. The Handmaid s Tale is a dystopian novel written by Margaret Atwood in 1985. The novel follows its protagonist Offred as she lives in a society focused on physical and spiritual oppression of the female identity. Within The Handmaid s Tale it is evident that through theRead MoreThe Handmaid s Tale Of Women1858 Words   |  8 Pageskeepers, the Commander’s wife, and other red handmaids One major reason for banning The Handmaid s Tale is sexism. Offred, the main character, explains in her journal; We are for breeding purposes: we aren t concubines, geisha girls, courtesans (Atwood 136). Clearly the handmaids are only used to make babies because the wives of the commanders cannot reproduce. These women are forced into this sexist act solely because of their social class and gender. They are treated unfairly not by just males

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

The Battle Of The War Essay - 1510 Words

Between the four years of 1861 and 1865 the United States was engaged in a Civil War. This involved a division between the free North and the slave holding South, where eleven southern states split from the Union, altogether refusing the idea of a single American nation. Abraham Lincoln, who was the president at the time, disapproved of this revolt and had â€Å"500,000 soldiers to crush what threatened to be an aggressive rebellion.† In April 1861, the first shots were fired, and what followed became an unthinkable tragedy of gigantic proportions. Thousands upon thousands of soldiers were killed and millions more wounded; large areas of the South were engulfed by aggressive battles almost resulting in a Union defeat under determined Confederate forces. Focusing on the major turning point battle of the war, the Battle at Gettysburg, the confederate Army was led by General Robert E. Lee, and the Union Army was led by General George G. Meade. This battle lasted for three days - July 1st through the 3rd, 1863, and ended when the Confederates had failed to break up the main Union line. On July 2 of the battle, more than â€Å"15,000 soldiers were killed or wounded in just six hours of the battling.† The casualties on just that one day are more than â€Å"three times the number of American casualties in the D-Day invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944.† These numbers would be sure to find itself in American history as being the bloodiest battle in US history, but the battle s greater importanceShow MoreRelatedThe Battle Of The War1439 Words   |  6 PagesWorld War One was the cause of over eleven million military personnel deaths. Six million of those came from the side of the Triple Entente, or Allies. New fighting strategies that emphasized throwing more and more men into the fight only exacerbated the problem. Military leaders on the side of the Allies failed to adapt and sacrificed the lives of many that could have been avoided. Based on concrete evidence that was collected, this was a major factor in high casualty numbers during the war becauseRea d MoreThe Battle Of The War918 Words   |  4 PagesIndians come from, Custer was as surprised as McCoy. McCoy’s unit was surrounded by NVA regulars before they knew it, and they where pissed. Nowhere to run or hide they prepared for battle, perhaps their last battle, but you could say that about every battle. They are outnumbered 20 to 1. In the heat of battle one cannot swear who shot or killed whom, it was just constant motion, first very fast, then very slowly. McCoy s arms had become numb from swinging the ax handle he held. Smashing in headsRead MoreThe Battle Of The War1146 Words   |  5 PagesUnion mobilized for war, and America starts growing fearsome to what the future would look like. This was the day WWII started, which claimed millions of lives on both sides. Everybody is interested in the action and battles, but what about the production of the war? Without the production of the arms and food, these battles would not even have happened. The following is what each country in the Allied powers contributed during WWII. Hoping they would not be dragged into the war, American hopes wereRead MoreThe Battle Of The War1041 Words   |  5 PagesAs the battle began, most of the Samian fleet deserted. Herodotus isn’t sure about which triremes fled and which didn’t, as the reports he received were confused. The Samians were first in line in battle and once they had set sail for home, the Lesbians who were second in line did the same. The Chians were the most heroic people during this fight. They had contributed one hundred ships to the combined fleet, each containing forty men. This speaks very highly of the Chians. Even though most othersRead MoreThe Battle Of The War942 Words   |  4 PagesIn the 1899 Conference at The Hague, 59 sovereign states declared that they will abstain from the use of all kinds of diffusing, asphyxiating, or deleterious projectiles in case of an imminent war. But on the 22nd of April 1915, the agreement was disregarded. Germany was engaged in a series of battles against the strongest force of the French. The situation of the battlefield, because of the static trench warfare was alarming for the German commanders. The Oberste Heeresleitung identified that theRead MoreThe Battle Of The War Essay1076 Words   |  5 Pagesall those who had something riding on the outcome of the war. Though they were subjected to different sides of the war, George Washington, King George III of England and William Howe all experienced the hardships and trying times of the year 1776. General George Washington knew that he lacked experience with almost all aspects of the war. He had retired from military life fifteen years before the revolution, and had never led an army in battle, commanded anything more than a regiment or directed aRead MoreThe Battle Of War And War1321 Words   |  6 PagesThere are many different components to war, far beyond the soldiers and battlefields. Soldiers at war may make the ultimate sacrifice in the sequence of battle, but societies at war deal with the compromise. War requires more non-renewable resources than any other industry in the world, the most abundant of those resources being humans. Since July 4, 1776 the US has been in some sort of conflict for 222 of the 239 years since that day. Humans require more basic necessities than any other living organismRead MoreThe Battle Of The War981 Words   |  4 Pages262 jets. In the opening phases of the battle, they would be facing only some 80,000 men, less than 250 pieces of armor and about 400 artillery guns. Many of the American troops were inexperienced; the German force included battle-hardened veterans of the tough fighting on the Eastern Front, but they, too, had green units filled with boys and with men who normally would have been considered too old for military service. During the course of the month-long battle, some 500,000 German, 600,000 AmericanRead MoreThe Battle Of The War1499 Words   |  6 Pagesprepared to take charge towards their enemies (from google images) During this difficult time at war, soldiers have had to spend the last four years of their lives in between narrow walls called trenches. Not only do these soldiers face the extremities of battles, but they also have to survive in these narrow spaces. For these courageous men, living in these trenches meant living in fear. As the war has been mentioned that it is coming to an end, soldiers still have to keep up with their daily routinesRead MoreThe Battle Of The War1498 Words   |  6 PagesConfederates enter the war with a belief that would also sustain them during war years and ultimately shape the south after the war, a durable belief in their invincibility. Even after major turning points of the war, diehard Rebels continued to express a resilient belief in their invincibility. They were unconquerable and they truly stuck it about because they expected to win. Their ethos; beliefs of being highly favored children of God, attitudes of invincibility (homegrown and those spread

“Judgements about dialects are often essentially judgements about the speakers of those dialects Free Essays

string(229) " this linguistic superficiality is perpetuated by the media; characters on television or radio that represent non-standardised dialects are often simply manifestations of traits commonly associated with their respective culture\." Language is primarily considered to perform two major functions in society. It is designed to convey information to those around us as well as establish and maintain relationships. However, linguistically (albeit from social stereotypes) certain paradigms relating to class, social and financial status are attributed to dialects – a consensus that has been perpetuated in recent times due to the diversity of today’s society and the integration of many differing dialects and languages in cities and countryside alike. We will write a custom essay sample on â€Å"Judgements about dialects are often essentially judgements about the speakers of those dialects or any similar topic only for you Order Now Indeed, a stereotype regarding a dialect usually derives from the views held on the characteristics of its speakers. Although a direct correlation between the aforemented stereotypes and linguistic fact has little scientific basis in reality it has not served to reduce the almost established dialect prejudice rife in the media, judiciary and education systems. In the early 20th Century, the ‘Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis’ advanced the theory that the derivative of language we use is respective of our social, cultural and ideological background, and ever since various linguists and sociolinguists have studied dialectal differences and correlation between dialect and social judgments therein to determine the extent and implications of prevalent dialect prejudice. The size of the British Isles often leads people to discern that the languages predominant in England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland are homogenous and that one dialect (‘British English’) is the most prevalent throughout, but even within a nation the size of England there is a great diversity of dialect both regionally and socially. Though these respective dialects can be categorised in vague groups such as ‘north’ and ‘south’ they do not adhere to any sharp boundaries or coincide with county/city lines. Instead, dialects are said to form a â€Å"dialect continuum†1 as they merge and alter near other cities or counties (i.e.: other dialects) so therefore one cannot define dialectal boundaries as they would be based on social fact, not linguistic. The most ubiquitous dialects within society (‘Geordie’, ‘Cockney’, Jock’, etc.) often receive the most scrutiny for their variation to standardised English, and it is because of this that the speakers of respective dialects are stereotyped with traits common to their culture. However, while it is true that some dialects represent certain social and political variants, this is predominantly due to geographical reasons and not because a dialect accurately represents one cohesive body of social genre. Also, the extent of Dialect Continuum means that dialects are often bandied together into broad categories (Geordie, Scot, etc.) meaning that certain dialects are often misinterpreted as others and therefore leads to people being attributed characteristics of a similar dialect. This reiterates the irrational social judgments by which dialects are often quantified as its speakers can be attributed to a dialectal collective that, while phonetically similar, may be wholly unrelated. An active example of this is in one particular study which showed â€Å"attitudinal responses were statistically significant between speakers of different dialectal groups in Great Britain in spite of the fact that respondents were inaccurate in the identification of the area from which the speakers came†. Indeed, the hypothesis that dialect is representative of one’s background (which is linked intrinsically to social preconceptions) is accepted by the majority of sociolingustical commentators, the established view being that â€Å"accents and dialects have come to act as indicators not only of one’s relationship to a locality but also of one’s social class position† 3. The fundamental consensus of the ‘Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis’ (formulated in the early 20th Century by prominent linguists Edward Sapir and Benjamin Whorf) highlighting the striking difference between both languages themselves and their subsequent dialect derivatives, and that the surroundings and ideologies of a community are prominent in its form of speech. Therefore, one could discern that, if dialectal content necessitates the input of social background, judgments of dialects could be verified as the respective social traits of the speaker are evident in what they say and how it is said. In Britain, â€Å"people are often able to make instant and unconscious judgements about someone’s class affiliation on the basis of their accent†4. Indeed, phonetic factors assume a primary role in highlighting ones social background. A 1972 survey undertaken by National Opinion Polls in England provides an example of how significant speech differences are associated with social class variety. Subjects, randomly chosen from the British public, were asked which factor (from eleven provided) was most indicative of a person’s class. The most popular answer was ‘the way they speak’ followed by ‘where they live’. This evidence highlights, albeit only to a certain degree, that speech mannerisms (governed primarily by one’s dialect) are considered to be more indicative of one’s social class than education, occupation or income5. This is highlighted primarily through the paradigms of ‘Subjective Inequality’, which details the origins of linguistic prejudice in the public domain. Societies throughout the world credit characteristics such as intelligence, friendliness and status according to the traits of respective dialects, though these views are based not on linguistic merit – rather its emulation of the ‘received’ or ‘standardised’ variety of the language (the most revered British dialect utilised by various official establishments such as Government and the BBC). Thus, language is shown to proliferate social stereotypes, as it is one of the qualities (albeit highly unreliable) by which one is initially judged by those in the public domain. Despite the judgements of dialects categorizing the speaker with various socio-political elements, one should note that, from a purely linguistical standpoint, no regional dialect displays any signs of deficiency in its ability to convey information – social predispositions are therefore centred wholly on the idiosyncrasies and eccentricities of each respective dialect. This is a consensus supported by the majority of linguistic research (â€Å"there is nothing at all inherent in non-standard variety dialects that make them linguistically inferior†6). People will invariably draw conclusions upon one’s persona regarding the characteristics of speech, not on its content. Indeed, due to the lack of linguistic discrepancy between the respective British dialects it is discernable that, aside from social factors, they are arbitrarily stigmatised. However, many maintain that this linguistic superficiality is perpetuated by the media; characters on television or radio th at represent non-standardised dialects are often simply manifestations of traits commonly associated with their respective culture. You read "â€Å"Judgements about dialects are often essentially judgements about the speakers of those dialects" in category "Papers" Furthermore, some Sociolinguists have propagated the theory that perceived linguistic inequality (namely those dialects that do not conform to standardised forms of pronunciation and syntax) is a consequence of social inequality as â€Å"language is one of the most important means by which social inequality is perpetuated from generation to generation†7.The language and style utilised within a society has an innate relationship with the geography, occupation and ideologies prevalent in the community – making dialectal prejudice easier to circulate as the social traits of a speaker are evident in his diction and style of conversation. This is again based upon the ‘Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis’, maintaining that language (and thus dialect) structure is, to some extent, influenced by a society’s surroundings which in turn affects the way the community perceives the world around it. In reality, dialect prejudice is apparent in every sector of society, from education to business, highlighted through the ‘matched-guise’ experiments conducted by Strongman and Woozley in 1969. These experiments served to highlight the extent to which people are quantified on the basis of their dialect and consisted of groups of subjects listening to people reciting a passage to assess the perceived traits of prevalent ‘RP English’, Yorkshire, Northern and Scottish dialects. The subjects were then asked to gauge certain attributes regarding each speaker (friendliness, intelligence, success, etc.). The results showed that several of the dialects emerged with stereotypical traits – despite the fact that linguistically, none of the speakers had recited the passage any better or worse than the others as each speaker had been the same person adopting a series of dialects. Table 1 – Results from W.P. Robinson ‘Language and Social Behaviour’ (1972). RP English Intelligent, successful, not friendly. Yorkshire Dialects Perceived as†¦ Serious, kind-hearted, not intelligent. Scottish Dialects Friendly, good-natured. Northern Dialects Industrious, reliable, lower class. It is clear from this that society assumes characteristic inferences upon others based primarily on their dialects. In short, speech characteristics of a social stereotype inherit the stereotypes evaluation. Further evidence of this is seen from an experiment conducted in America to highlight the prejudice between public reception of prominent ethnic and native dialects. A single speaker was recorded and played to listening subjects saying the word ‘hello’ in three dialects: Standard American English (SAE), Chicano English (ChE), and African American Vernacular English (AAVE). Variation in the tenseness of the vowel and pitch prominence on the first syllable of ‘hello’ was enough to elicit a significantly accurate identification of the dialects by listeners. When the stimulus was expanded to include ‘Hello, I’m calling about the apartment you have advertised in the paper’, in actual calls to landlords (who were obviously unaware of the experiment), the SAE speaker guise was given an appointment to see housing at roughly the seventy percent level. Both the AAVE and ChE guises were given appointments only about thirty percent of the time8. This underlines the universal presence of dialect prejudice, the latter dialects are shown be regarded in certain sectors as less prestigious than the former. There is a great deal of evidence to underline lack of knowledge that institutes these social judgements of dialectal variety. Firstly, the prominent linguist Edward Sapir maintained that dialect and culture are not always intrinsically associated and that many unrelated cultures can share very similar dialectal derivatives of the same language. An active example of this was prevalent in aboriginal America – the Athabaskan varieties are clearly unified despite the wide distribution of its people, from the hunting communities of Western Canada to the ritualised Southwest. The illogical stigmatisation of dialects highlighted in the stigma towards the employment of double negatives in certain dialects (an action that is derided as a sign of low social standing or poor intelligence). Whilst being both widely considered a standard linguistical construction in other languages (e.g.: French and Arabic) and prevalent in such classical literary works as Shakespeare and Chaucer, modern English encourages the marginalisation of its usage. Thus, it is evident yet again that perceptions regarding dialects are not founded upon established linguistic principles, the case in point highlighting that syntactical and grammatical constructs are more figurative in a dialects perception. This has in turn lead sociolinguists to conclude that dialects cannot be adversely regarded on account of grammatical inconsistencies, as â€Å"these features have no intrinsic consequences for our capacity to communicate or restrict the range of meanings we can express†9. Furthermore, the illogical parameters by which dialects are linguistically quantified are reiterated in the cultural paradox of ‘American’ and ‘British’ English. In England, dialects without a non-prevolic /r/ are given prestige and constitute an integral part of the ‘RP’ dialect; those that do not share this trait are stigmatised and portrayed as belonging to a rural and/or uneducated populace. Conversely, in New York those containing a non-prevolic /r/ are socially marginalized whilst non-prevolic /r/ usage is commonplace in upper class society. In English towns such as Reading and Bristol this pattern is again reversed – serving to reiterate that value judgements regarding dialect are completely random (at least from a linguistic standpoint). As well as this, another example of social perception strongly influencing the respective status’ of dialects was conducted in New York by Labov, who examined shop assistant speech patterns in three differing department stores of high, medium and low repute. The procedure was then to ask several clerks a question regarding the department (e.g.: ‘where are the woman’s shoes?’) with two possible occurrences of non-prevolic /r/, to test the hypothesis that non-prevolic /r/ usage correlates with social class. Table 2 – Results of the Labov’s Survey, taken from P. Trudgill (1983). High-ranking Store 38% used no non-prevolic /r/. Medium-ranking Store 49% used no non-prevolic /r/. Low-ranking Store 83% used no non-prevolic /r/. Thus Labov discerned that, to a certain extent, his hypothesis was verified: those dialects that do not frequently use non-prevolic /r/ are usually of a lower class. Also, this experiment demonstrated the paradigm that dialects are socially affected; the fact that this dialectal trait is marginalized is due to its affiliation with lower classes, reinforcing the fact that views on dialect are socially governed10. The communal view of certain dialects is not determined arbitrarily; they have as much to do with personal opinions regarding the dialect as the social and cultural values of the respective community. Certain dialects are given more prestige and status than others, which leads to some being more favourably evaluated than others (some are considered ‘good’ or ‘attractive’ whilst others are regarded as ‘slovenly’ or ‘bad’ in comparison). Dialects judgements are again propagated through the media, the frequent usage of ‘RP’ English in official reports and programs responsible for the high level prestige attributed to those that utilise it. Judgements about dialects are therefore based on social connotations as opposed to any inherent linguistic properties. In short, it is the speaker that is judged, rather than the speech. This consensus is reiterated by Giles and Sassoon11, who cite consistent findings of subjects evaluating anonymous speakers with more standardised dialects more favourably for such characteristics as intelligence, success and confidence. In Britain the middle class is associated with not only its widespread representation of the standard dialect (‘RP’ or ‘Estuary English’) but also speaking with in a formal, articulate style than more common or marginal dialects (‘Cockney’ and ‘Indian English’ respectively). However, whilst many linguists conclude that social judgments are the parameter that separates dialects, the linguist Brown12 proposed the notion that perhaps there was a linguistic discrepancy between the standardised and stigmatised dialects in society. Brown contrasted the speech characteristics of upper and lower social class French Canadian speakers of varying dialects reading a pre-set passage and discovered, relative to the lower class dialects, the upper class subjects were considered as more articulate and had a better range of intonation and diction. From this, one could discern that there is an argument to support the idea that dialects are not wholly based on social judgment and that dialects utilised by the upper classes are generally more articulate and a more accurate representation of standardised diction (widely considered the quintessential form of a language). Nevertheless, there is a great deal that negates the validity of this information; firstly, as the subjects were reading prepared material and not speaking freely they could have been judged partly on their reading ability – not their dialectal traits. Secondly, it is difficult for subjects to not be affected by their personal views with respect to certain dialects, as neutrality can be hard to maintain in the artificial environment in which the is experiment was set (which could also be considered an adverse factor in itself). Though some experiments have shown that dialects are, in certain respects, revered on a purely phonetic level, analysis of large amounts of data seemed to group together paired opposites which pointed to competence, personal integrity, and social attractiveness constructs in the evaluation of speaker voices. A great deal of subsequent research in this field confirmed that these constructs were regularly at work, and, more interestingly, that standardised (or â€Å"RP English†) speakers were most often judged highest on the competence dimension while nonstandard (or regionally and/or ethically distinct speakers) were rated higher for the integrity and attractiveness dimensions13. Irrespective of social background, we can see that dialects can be judged (albeit very rarely) solely upon the speaker’s representation of a particular dialect. In summary, the views surrounding many of today’s modern dialects are primarily based upon out-moded stereotypes of the culture that said dialects represent. Though linguists have proved that language is influenced by predominant factors within a community (surroundings, ideologies, etc.) it does not justify dialectal prejudice as the information upon which these are founded are often erroneous and generalised. There is a great deal of evidence to suggest that no dialect is linguistically inferior to any other as they all possess the capacity to convey information effectively (if they did not, they would have been discarded or adapted by its community, making their very presence today confirmation enough of their abilities). Limiting the social and occupational possibilities of a certain group of people through dialect prejudice (albeit for many a machiavellian-esque social stigma), simply preserves social asymmetries and propagates tension between differing cultural factions. How to cite â€Å"Judgements about dialects are often essentially judgements about the speakers of those dialects, Papers

Competitive Strategy Techniques Analyzing System

Question: Disucss about the Competitive Strategy for Techniques Analyzing System. Answer: Introduction Retail industry is characterized by high competition and low profit margins. The intense competition between the companies and the saturation of the business has resulted in the eroding profit margins between the companies (Hubbard et al., 2014). Moreover, there are limited options to obtain competitive advantage and most of the retail organizations are dependent upon cost leadership to maximize their profit share. Marketing is also crucial for the retail organizations to attract new customers and maintain the market share (Porter, 2008). Aldi is a leading retail business organization headquartered in Germany. The company was founded in 1964 and since then has become the leading discount retailer across the world. Aldi has created a name for itself by selling the grocery and the farm products at very low prices and tapping the low cost customers. The company keeps its price low by reducing the services offered to the customers and selling products in its own private brand. In the recent years, the company has given competition to various multinational retailers and forced them to reduce their price and profit margins. IN the UK, the major competitor of Aldi is lidl which is also a discount retailer. Both the companies are beating their competitors on premium products by offering bargain prices. Asda, Tesco and Morrisons are the major competitors of the company (Rodionova, 2016). Aldi entered the Greenfield Australian market in 2005 and has created substantial market share wherein no other foreign retail organization had been successful. In this essence, in this report, the marketing strategy of Aldi has been explored (Reynolds, 2014). Background to the Company The Aldi is a brand which encompasses two supermarket retail chains. It has stores over 18 countries and the expanding in other countries. The company operates in major parts of Europe, Australia and the USA. There are about 8000 stores of Aldi situated in different parts across the world. Aldi began its operations in the UK in 1990; however, its presence in the country is limited. In the recent years, the market share of the company is constantly growing due to its no frill attached cheap services. Several affluent customers have also started attracting towards cheap and low cost products offered by the company. The growing affluence of the retail chain has dreaded the previous supermarket chains and the companies have adopted strategies to reduce their prices. In Australia, the company initiated operations in 2001. At that time, the retail market of Australia was dominated by the duopoly of Coles and Woolworths who had maximum market share. Other than that, a local discount retaile r named Franklins was also operational. Although the retail market of Australia was a Greenfield operation, several foreign retailers entered the Australian market and failed as they were unable to snatch their market share from the market leaders. However, Aldi has become successful in the Australian markets as it obtained the market share of Franklins after its failure and provided qualitative products to the customers. Marketing Analysis In order to capture market share and attract new customers, the companies adopt robust marketing strategy. The marketing strategy of a company is strongly related to the sales and operations and the public relations of the company. The business organizations strategize their marketing activities to coordinate marketing activities and maximizing the impact of the marketing tactics (Leake, Vaccarello and Ginty, 2012). In this regard, the marketing methods of Aldi in Australia have been examined in the below section: Aldis Marketing Strategy The marketing strategies of a company can be differentiated under three generic strategies, namely, focus, differentiation and cost leadership. In the focus strategy, the company focuses on a narrow customer segment and adapts its products according to the needs of targeted customers. The differentiation marketing strategy refers to the marketing methods wherein the company develops different marketing plans according to the different target customers. In contrast to it, the cost leadership marketing strategy refers to the marketing strategy wherein the companies reduce their operational cost and pass that cost advantage to their customers (Leake, Vaccarello and Ginty, 2012.). Basically, in the cost leadership strategy, the business organizations market themselves as the cheapest seller of the services. Cost Leadership: It can be examined that Aldi has adopted the marketing strategy of cost leadership and differentiated strategy. In the cost leadership strategy, the company has reduced the operational costs associated with the operations of the retail stores. The retail stores are built with a simple design for easy navigation and the customers are provided with no extra services. The most important contributor to the cheap prices offered by the company is the private labels which are the product manufactured by the company. The retailer also sells fewer items than a typical retail store which increases sales volume and drive discount. Moreover, by implementing private labels the company reduces the cost of the middle man (Lutz, 2015). As discussed above, the designing of the store are done in a manner such that the operational costs are optimized. The stores use natural sunlight and utility costs are minimized. The working of the store managers is also optimized by using stock shel ves instead of boxes. In the same essence, the company has implemented several strategies such as easy scanning, check-out system, self-service and use of shopping carts to reduce the costs to the company. Differentiated Strategy: The Company has implemented differentiated strategy to tap customers from different market segments. In this strategy, the company has targeted the low cost customers and the environmentally aware people. It has targeted its marketing strategy to the environmentally conscious people by increasing the number of environmental friendly policies. It promotes its energy efficient drives, and promotes itself as a socially responsible retail marketer. The company introduces itself as an organization which is not operational twenty four hours and thus adopts energy efficient practices. Moreover, it also promoted the sourcing of fresh fruits and vegetables and the environmentally-friendly packaging. It has also participated in several communities that promote the child nutrition, no artificial color and quality testing (Aldi, 2017). It can be inferred from the above discussion that Aldi follows the strategy of cost leadership and the differentiated marketing strategy. Strategic Marketing Options So far, Aldi has been successful in creating a substantial market share for itself in the Australian market. However, the company can increase its market share by adopting several marketing tactics. In the following section, several recommendations are made to develop the marketing plan of Aldi. Use of Online Methods: As the company is focused on reducing its operational costs, it can implement online methods to drive its marketing strategy. The online methods are cheap and viable option to communicate with the young generation through social media. The company should be responsive of the messages and the complaints of the customers. Other than that, the company should also focus on connecting with its customers on the social media. Aldi can also implement email marketing and social page optimization to attract customers (Leake, Vaccarello and Ginty, 2012). It can share the new schemes and the discount offers to the customers though online methods. Offering free newsletter: Aldi can enhance its customer base by offering a free newsletter. The newsletter will contain information regarding the new offers, products offered by the organization and discounts. It will help the company to increase its potential customer base. Free newsletters are accessible to everyone and it increases brand awareness. Along with it, the company can start blog in the online media wherein it can connect with its customers. The company should connect with its customers and ask for their opinion and responses for the services provided. Incorporating the suggestions of the customers will increase the customer satisfaction and the service quality (Gilmore, 2003). Offer excellent Customer Service: Aldi provided minimal customer services to its customers to reduce its operational costs. However, in Australia the company is also targeting the middle-class customers by providing quality products at reasonable rates. These customers are habitual of getting excellent customer services. Therefore, Aldi can initiate to provide excellent customer services to its customers. The company can hire experienced professionals from the competitor companies such as Coles and Woolworths to incorporate their market knowledge and customer satisfaction techniques into their working (Brink and Berndt, 2008). Building Partnership with the Suppliers: Aldi is a discount retail organization. The company resists selling branded products and relies on its own private label. The company should focus on establishing partnerships with the local suppliers and the farmers in Australia so that it can reduce the cost by bulk operations (Brink and Berndt, 2008). Investing in the longevity of the Customer Relationship: If the involvement of the customer is high with the company, it is more likely that the customers will stay in the company rather than going to its competitors. The company should focus on delivering high quality customer service to enhance customer satisfaction. Asking the customers for their feedback will also make them feel important. Enhancing the customer satisfaction will result in word of mouth publicity which will increase the brand awareness and customer loyalty (Mudie and Pirrie, 2006). Conclusion It can be concluded that the Aldi is prominent discount retailer which has developed numerous strategies to develop its market share in Australia. Aldi was founded in Germany and over the years opened its retail stores in several countries of Europe, the UK and the USA. The company has been successful in developing a niche low cost market. In Australia, the company has implemented two strategies of cost leadership and differentiated strategy to attract customers. In the cost leadership strategy, the company provides its products at a comparatively lower rate than its competitors. In Australia, the major competitors of the company are Coles and Woolworths which offer products at comparatively higher rates. Aldi has forced these companies to reduce their prices. Along with it, the company also follows the differentiated strategy and with it tries to capture the environmental-friendly customers. This strategy can be perceived in the designing of the stores, product packaging and the use of light and utilities. Aldi can grow its market share in Australia by using online marketing channel and offering free newsletters. The company should also focus on building relationships with the suppliers and the increasing the customer efficiency. By building relationship with the customers, the company can invest in the longevity which will result in word of mouth publicity. The satisfied customers will publicize the company themselves and the company can reap profits from it. References Aldi. 2017. Environment. [Online]. Available at: https://corporate.aldi.us/en/corporate-responsibility/environment/ [Accessed on: 21 January 2017]. Brink, A. and Berndt, A. 2008.Relationship Marketing and Customer Relationship Management. Cape Town: Juta and Company Ltd. Gilmore, A. 2003. Services Marketing and Management. London: SAGE. Hubbard, R.G., Garnett, A.M., Lewis, P. and OBrien, A.P. 2014. Microeconomics. Pearson Australia. Leake, W., Vaccarello, L, and Ginty, M. 2012. Complete B2B Online Marketing Serious skills. London: John Wiley Sons. Lutz, A. 2015. 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